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How to Master Microcontrollers: Theory and Applications by Ajay V Deshmukh (PDF Available)


- What is the book "Microcontrollers: Theory and Applications" by Ajay V Deshmukh about? - How can you download the pdf of the full book for free? H2: Microcontrollers: Basic Concepts - Definition and features of microcontrollers - Types and classifications of microcontrollers - Applications and advantages of microcontrollers H2: Microcontrollers: Architecture and Programming - Architecture and components of microcontrollers - Instruction set and programming languages for microcontrollers - Programming tools and techniques for microcontrollers H2: Microcontrollers: Peripheral Support and Interfacing - Peripheral devices and interfaces for microcontrollers - Serial and parallel communication protocols for microcontrollers - Analog and digital input/output devices for microcontrollers H2: Microcontrollers: Advanced Topics - Interrupts and timers for microcontrollers - Memory and data storage for microcontrollers - Power management and low-power modes for microcontrollers H2: Microcontrollers: Theory and Applications by Ajay V Deshmukh - Overview and summary of the book - Contents and structure of the book - Reviews and feedback on the book H2: How to Download the PDF of the Full Book for Free - Legal and ethical issues of downloading books for free - Sources and methods of downloading books for free - Tips and precautions for downloading books for free H1: Conclusion - Recap of the main points of the article - Call to action for the readers - References and resources for further reading Table 2: Article with HTML formatting Introduction




If you are interested in learning about microcontrollers, their theory and applications, then you have come to the right place. In this article, we will introduce you to one of the best books on this topic, written by Ajay V Deshmukh, a renowned expert in the field. We will also show you how you can download the pdf of the full book for free, so you can read it at your convenience.




New! microcontroller theory and application ajay v deshmukh free download pdf of full book



But first, let's start with some basics. What are microcontrollers and why are they important?


Microcontrollers: Basic Concepts




A microcontroller is a small computer on a single chip that can perform various tasks depending on how it is programmed. It consists of a central processing unit (CPU), memory, input/output (I/O) ports, timers, counters, serial communication interfaces, analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), digital-to-analog converters (DACs), and other peripherals. A microcontroller can be embedded in various devices such as appliances, toys, robots, cars, medical equipment, etc., to control their functions.


There are many types and classifications of microcontrollers based on their features, such as size, speed, power consumption, memory capacity, instruction set, architecture, etc. Some of the common types are 8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit, 64-bit, RISC (reduced instruction set computer), CISC (complex instruction set computer), Harvard (separate memory spaces for data and instructions), Von Neumann (shared memory space for data and instructions), etc.


The applications and advantages of microcontrollers are numerous. They can be used to perform various tasks such as sensing, processing, communicating, displaying, controlling, etc., with high accuracy, reliability, efficiency, flexibility, scalability, portability, security, etc. They can also be programmed to interact with other devices or systems using various protocols such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, ZigBee, CAN (controller area network), USB (universal serial bus), etc.


Microcontrollers: Architecture and Programming




The architecture and components of a microcontroller vary depending on its type and model. However, some of the common components are:


  • CPU: The brain of the microcontroller that executes the instructions and performs the arithmetic and logical operations.



  • Memory: The storage area of the microcontroller that holds the data and instructions. It can be divided into ROM (read-only memory), RAM (random-access memory), EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory), etc.



  • I/O Ports: The interface of the microcontroller that connects it to the external devices or circuits. It can be divided into digital I/O ports, analog I/O ports, serial I/O ports, etc.



  • Timers: The devices that generate and measure time intervals or pulses for various purposes such as delays, counting, frequency generation, etc.



  • Counters: The devices that count the number of pulses or events that occur in a given period of time.



  • Serial Communication Interfaces: The devices that enable the microcontroller to communicate with other devices or systems using serial data transmission such as UART (universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter), SPI (serial peripheral interface), I2C (inter-integrated circuit), etc.



  • ADCs: The devices that convert analog signals into digital values that can be processed by the microcontroller.



  • DACs: The devices that convert digital values into analog signals that can be output by the microcontroller.



  • Other Peripherals: The devices that provide additional functions or features to the microcontroller such as watchdog timer, reset circuit, oscillator, interrupt controller, etc.



The instruction set and programming languages for microcontrollers also vary depending on their type and model. However, some of the common languages are:


  • Assembly Language: The low-level language that uses mnemonics to represent the binary instructions of the microcontroller. It is fast, efficient, and gives direct control over the hardware, but it is difficult to write, read, debug, and maintain.



  • C Language: The high-level language that uses keywords and operators to represent the instructions of the microcontroller. It is easy to write, read, debug, and maintain, but it is slower, less efficient, and gives less control over the hardware than assembly language.



  • Other Languages: The languages that are derived from or compatible with C language such as C++, Arduino, Python, etc. They provide additional features or libraries to simplify or enhance the programming of microcontrollers.



The programming tools and techniques for microcontrollers also vary depending on their type and model. However, some of the common tools are:


  • Editor: The software that allows the programmer to write and edit the source code of the program.



  • Compiler: The software that converts the source code into executable code that can be understood by the microcontroller.



  • Assembler: The software that converts the assembly code into executable code that can be understood by the microcontroller.



  • Linker: The software that combines multiple executable files into a single file that can be loaded into the microcontroller.



  • Debugger: The software that allows the programmer to test and fix the errors or bugs in the program.



  • Simulator: The software that mimics the behavior and performance of the microcontroller without using the actual hardware.



  • Emulator: The hardware device that connects to the microcontroller and allows the programmer to monitor and modify its operation in real time.



  • Programmer: The hardware device that transfers the executable code from the computer to the memory of the microcontroller.



Microcontrollers: Peripheral Support and Interfacing




The peripheral devices and interfaces for microcontrollers are those external devices or circuits that extend or enhance the functionality or performance of microcontrollers. They can be divided into input devices, output devices, communication devices, etc. Some examples are:



  • Input Devices: The devices that provide input signals or data to the microcontroller such as switches, buttons, keyboards, sensors, etc.



  • Output Devices: The devices that receive output signals or data from the microcontroller such as LEDs (light-emitting diodes), LCDs (liquid crystal displays), speakers, motors, actuators, etc.



  • Communication Devices: The devices that enable the microcontroller to communicate with other devices or systems using various protocols such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, ZigBee, CAN (controller area network), USB (universal serial bus), etc.




channels. Some examples are:



  • UART: The protocol that uses asynchronous serial data transmission between two devices using a start bit, a stop bit, and an optional parity bit to indicate the beginning, the end, and the error detection of each data frame.



  • SPI: The protocol that uses synchronous serial data transmission between one master device and one or more slave devices using four wires: clock (SCK), master output slave input (MOSI), master input slave output (MISO), and slave select (SS).



  • I2C: The protocol that uses synchronous serial data transmission between one or more master devices and one or more slave devices using two wires: serial data (SDA) and serial clock (SCL). Each device has a unique address that is used to identify it on the bus.




The analog and digital input/output devices for microcontrollers are those devices that provide or receive analog or digital signals or data to or from the microcontroller. Analog signals are continuous signals that vary in amplitude and frequency. Digital signals are discrete signals that have only two states: high or low. Some examples are:



  • ADCs: The devices that convert analog signals into digital values that can be processed by the microcontroller.



  • DACs: The devices that convert digital values into analog signals that can be output by the microcontroller.



  • PWM (pulse-width modulation): The technique that generates analog signals by varying the duty cycle of a digital signal. It can be used to control the speed of motors, the brightness of LEDs, etc.




Microcontrollers: Advanced Topics




The interrupts and timers for microcontrollers are those features or functions that enable the microcontroller to respond to external or internal events or perform tasks at specific intervals. Interrupts are signals that cause the microcontroller to temporarily stop its normal execution and jump to a predefined subroutine called an interrupt service routine (ISR). Timers are devices that generate and measure time intervals or pulses for various purposes such as delays, counting, frequency generation, etc. Some examples are:



  • External Interrupts: The interrupts that are triggered by external sources such as switches, sensors, communication devices, etc. They can be edge-triggered (activated by a change in the signal level) or level-triggered (activated by a specific signal level).



  • Internal Interrupts: The interrupts that are triggered by internal sources such as timers, counters, ADCs, etc. They can be periodic (activated at regular intervals) or non-periodic (activated at random intervals).



  • Timer Interrupts: The interrupts that are triggered by timers when they overflow or match a preset value.



  • Watchdog Timer: The timer that resets the microcontroller if it does not receive a periodic signal from the program. It can be used to prevent the microcontroller from hanging or crashing due to software errors or hardware faults.




The memory and data storage for microcontrollers are those features or functions that enable the microcontroller to store and retrieve data and instructions. Memory can be divided into ROM (read-only memory), RAM (random-access memory), EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory), etc. Data storage can be divided into internal data storage (built-in memory) and external data storage (external devices). Some examples are:



  • ROM: The memory that stores the program code and constants that do not change during the execution of the program. It can be programmed only once or a few times using a programmer device.



  • RAM: The memory that stores the variables and temporary data that change during the execution of the program. It can be read and written many times but it loses its contents when the power is turned off.



  • EEPROM: The memory that stores the data that need to be retained even when the power is turned off. It can be read and written many times using electrical signals but it has a limited number of write cycles.



  • Flash Memory: The memory that is similar to EEPROM but it can be erased and written in blocks rather than bytes. It has a higher capacity and speed than EEPROM but it also has a limited number of write cycles.



  • SD Card: The external device that uses flash memory to store large amounts of data. It can be interfaced with the microcontroller using SPI or SDIO protocols.



The power management and low-power modes for microcontrollers are those features or functions that enable the microcontroller to reduce its power consumption and extend its battery life. Power management involves adjusting the voltage and frequency of the microcontroller according to its workload and environmental conditions. Low-power modes involve shutting down or slowing down some or all of the components of the microcontroller when they are not needed. Some examples are:



  • Sleep Mode: The mode that shuts down the CPU and most of the peripherals of the microcontroller while keeping the RAM and some of the peripherals active. It can be woken up by an external or internal interrupt.



  • Deep Sleep Mode: The mode that shuts down the CPU and all of the peripherals of the microcontroller while keeping only a small portion of the RAM active. It can be woken up by a reset or a specific interrupt.



  • Idle Mode: The mode that slows down the CPU and some of the peripherals of the microcontroller while keeping the rest of the components active. It can be resumed by any interrupt.



  • Power-Down Mode: The mode that shuts down the CPU and all of the peripherals of the microcontroller while keeping only a small portion of the ROM active. It can be woken up by a reset or a specific interrupt.




Microcontrollers: Theory and Applications by Ajay V Deshmukh




Now that we have covered some of the basic and advanced topics of microcontrollers, let us introduce you to one of the best books on this subject, written by Ajay V Deshmukh, a renowned expert in the field. The book is called "Microcontrollers: Theory and Applications" and it was published by McGraw-Hill Education in 2005.


The book is a comprehensive and lucid guide to microcontrollers, their architecture, programming, and interfacing. It covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of microcontrollers, with numerous examples, exercises, case studies, and projects. The book is suitable for students, teachers, engineers, hobbyists, and professionals who want to learn about microcontrollers or enhance their skills in this domain.


The book is divided into 12 chapters, each covering a different topic related to microcontrollers. The chapters are as follows:



  • Introduction to Microcontrollers: This chapter gives an overview of microcontrollers, their history, evolution, features, types, classifications, applications, advantages, etc.



  • Microprocessor Architecture: This chapter explains the basic concepts of microprocessor architecture such as registers, buses, ALU (arithmetic logic unit), CU (control unit), instruction cycle, addressing modes, etc.



  • Microcontroller Architecture: This chapter describes the architecture and components of microcontrollers such as CPU, memory, I/O ports, timers, counters, serial communication interfaces, ADCs, DACs, etc.



  • Instruction Set: This chapter discusses the instruction set and programming languages for microcontrollers such as assembly language, C language, etc.



assembler, linker, debugger, simulator, emulator, programmer, etc.


  • Peripheral Support and Interfacing: This chapter explains the peripheral devices and interfaces for microcontrollers such as input devices, output devices, communication devices, serial and parallel communication protocols, analog and digital input/output devices, etc.



  • Interrupts and Timers: This chapter covers the interrupts and timers for microcontrollers such as external interrupts, internal interrupts, timer interrupts, watchdog timer, etc.



  • Memory and Data Storage: This chapter discusses the memory and data storage for microcontrollers such as ROM, RAM, EEPROM, flash memory, SD card, etc.



  • Power Management and Low-Power Modes: This chapter describes the power management and low-power modes for microcontrollers such as sleep mode, deep sleep mode, idle mode, power-down mode, etc.



  • Case Studies: This chapter presents some case studies of microcontroller applications such as temperature controller, traffic light controller, calculator, digital clock, etc.



  • Projects: This chapter provides some projects of microcontroller applications such as LED blinker, LCD display, keypad interface, speaker interface, motor control, sensor interface, wireless communication, etc.



  • Appendices: This chapter contains some useful information such as data sheets of microcontrollers and peripheral devices, instruction set summary tables, ASCII code table, etc.




The book is written in a clear and concise manner, with easy-to-understand diagrams and illustrations. It also includes review questions and answers at the end of each chapter to test the reader's understanding of the concepts. The book is well-organized and well-structured, with a logical flow of topics and a coherent presentation of ideas. The book is also up-to-date and relevant to the current trends and developments in the field of microcontrollers.


How to Download the PDF of the Full Book for Free




If you are interested in reading this book and learning more about microcontrollers, their theory and applications, you might be wondering how you can download the pdf of the full book for free. After all, buying a hard copy or an e-book can be expensive or inconvenient for some people. However, before you start searching for ways to download the book for free, you should be aware of some legal and ethical issues that might arise from doing so.


you might face legal consequences such as fines, lawsuits, or even jail time. Therefore, you should always respect the law and the rights of the authors and publishers when downloading books online.


Secondly, you should also know that downloading books for free without the consent of the author or the publisher is unethical in most cases. It is considered a form of disrespect or dishonesty that violates the moral principles of the society. It can also harm the readers and the society by reducing the quality and diversity of the books available. Therefore, if you download books for free without permission, you might face ethical consequences such as guilt, shame, or criticism. Therefore, you should always respect the values and the norms of the society when downloading books online.


However, there might be some exceptions or situations where downloading books for free might be legal or ethical. For example, if the book is in the public domain (meaning that its copyright has expired or been waived), if the book is licensed under a creative commons or a similar license (meaning that its use and distribution are allowed under certain conditions), if the book is offered for free by the author or the publisher (meaning that they have given their consent and approval), or if the book is required


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